Sunday, February 19, 2012

WALNUT ENCRUSTED ORANGE ROUGHY WITH HERBED MILLET & GREEN BEANS

Tonight I made a fish recipe from one of my favorite cookbooks, The Family Chef.  I barely modified the original recipe, changing only the recommended spice blend.   We ate our wild-caught fish with organic green beans sauteed in a little olive oil & garlic with herb-garlic millet.  My meat-&-potato-loving-husband has been very patient with my kitchen adventures & the new grains showing up on our dinner plates.  We both really enjoyed this meal!


**I apologize for the lack of pictures.  I didn't realize that my SD card wasn't into my camera until the meal was done**

I served this with millet (similar to rice) & green beans.  I started the millet before the fish, because it takes 25 min to cook. I made the green beans while the fish was in the oven.  This entire meal took about 45 minutes to prepare & cook.

WALNUT ENCRUSTED WHITEFISH INGREDIENTS (Yields 4 servings)
4 6oz pieces of whitefish, skin on  if possible (I used orange roughy which did not have the skin on)
1/2 cup walnuts
1/4 cup spelt flour (or all purpose flour)
1 egg, beaten
3/4 tsp paprika
3/4 tsp parsley (dried)
3/4 tsp garlic powder

1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp salt
(the original recipe calls for 1.5 tsp Cajun seasoning or Chef Paul Prudhomme's Blackened Redfish Magic)
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tbsp butter
1/2 lemon

PREPARATION
1.  Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. 
2.  Coarsely chop the walnuts in a food processor (pulse) or with a knife.
3.  Place the following in separate shallow dishes: egg, flour + the spice mix, & crushed walnuts.  I used a divided appetizer tray, but any shallow dishes will work.
4.  Dip the fish in the egg, then coat with flour, than dip into the walnuts.  If your fish has skin, only do this to the flesh side.  If your fish is skinless, coat both sides.  Place the coated fish on a plate.
5.  Once all pieces are coated, heat the olive oil & butter in an oven-safe skillet (I used a corning-wear baking dish).  Saute the fish 2-3 minutes, walnut side-down.  Do not let the nuts burn.  When the nuts are browned, carefully flip the fish & cook another 2-3 minutes.  I used a spatula & tongs. 
6.  Place the skillet/baking dish in the oven & cook until the fish is done (mine took 12 minutes).
7.  When it's done, squeeze lemon over the fish & eat immediately!

HERBED MILLET
Millet is a versatile grain.  If you leave it alone while cooking, it comes out fluffy like rice.  If you stir it while it cooks, it has a mashed-potato like texture.  Millet can used for a savory or sweet dish.  I have only prepared it twice, but look forward to trying out new meals with millet. 
If you want to learn more about Millet, check out these links:
Wikipedia
Chet Day's Health & Beyond
Nutritional Data for Millet
You can use whatever herbs you prefer.  If you don't have fresh herbs, dried will work.
1/2 cup dry millet
1.5 cups water
a little olive oil
a pinch of salt (optional)
2 garlic cloves, minced (optional)
1/4 onion, diced
3 sprigs of thyme, leaves removes & stems discarded (optional)
1  Tbsp parsley, chopped (I cut 1 stem from my plant)

In a saucepan, saute the garlic & onion in olive oil for a minute.  Add the water, millet, salt, & herbs.  Bring to a boil, then simmer for 25 minutes, covered & undisturbed if you want a rice-like texture.  (You can stir occasionally to get a mashed potato-like texture if you prefer).  Here's an idea for using up left-over millet.

GREEN BEANS
2 large handfuls, rinsed & stems trimmed
1 garlic clove, minced
a pinch of salt (optional)
a little olive oil
1/2 ounce water

In a skillet, heat the olive oil.  Add the green beans & coat well with oil.  Add a little water & cover.  Cook for 1-2 minutes.  Uncover & add the garlic.  Cook about 30sec-1min, or until do to your preference.  Add the salt if desired.

ER4YT Ingredient Ratings for B+/Nomad
(Please see the disclaimer at the bottom of the website regarding this table.)
Ingredient
SWAMI Nomad B+ Secretor Rating
B+ Secretor ER4YT Rating
butter
Neutral
Superfood
cayenne pepper
Neutral (cancer-super beneficial)
Neutral
egg (chicken)
Neutral
Superfood
garlic
Neutral
Temporary Avoid
green Beans
Neutral
Neutral
lemon
Neutral
Superfood
millet
Beneficial
Superfood, diamond
olive oil
Beneficial
Super Food, Diamond
onion
Neutral
Superfood
orange roughy
Neutral
Superfood
paprika
Neutral
Superfood
parsley
Beneficial
Neutral
spelt (white spelt flour)
Neutral
Temporary Avoid
thyme
Neutral
Superfood
walnuts
Beneficial (Black)
Neutral


Following Eat Right For Your Type?  Click here to jump to Dr. D'Adamo's Typebase Index to see how the ingredients in this recipe work for you.
Do you want to learn more about the Blood Type Diet?  See the links I have posted in the left column of this site under the heading "Learn More About the Blood Type Diet."


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7 comments:

  1. Thanks!  We had the leftovers tonight & I wish there was more.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Is millet better than rice? I keep reading that white rice is not so good, but skinny Asian people eat rice, so what gives? Any insights?

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm not a nutritionist, but I don't think rice is bad.  I love rice, especially brown basmati.  As part of a balanced meal, I think rice or millet are very similar.  I like millet becuase it's a little different....I like to mix it up!

    Wikipedia has an awesome table comparing raw nutrition data of staples.    
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millet#Nutrition

    I found a great nutrition website.  A serving of cooked long-grain brown rice & a cup of cooked milled are similar.  Millet has a little more protein, less calories, & less fiber.

    Cooked millet: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5702/2
    Cooked brown rice: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5707/2
    Cooked white rice: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5712/2

    I hope that helps!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Here's another great website about millet: 
    http://chetday.com/millet.html

    ReplyDelete
  5. You are welcome.  Millet can be cooked like rice.  If you leave it alone while cooking, it comes out fluffy like rice.  If you stir it while it cooks, it has a mashed-potato like texture.  It is very versatile & can be part of a savory or sweet dish.  I have only prepared it twice, but look forward to trying out new meals with millet.

    ReplyDelete

If you have comments or suggestions, please share them!